Exercise Moves For Osteoporosis

Suitable Exercise Moves For Osteoporosis

You may be concerned that being physical increases the chances of falling and breaking a joint. However, the opposite is true. Falls and fractures may be prevented with a standard, well-designed fitness regimen. That’s because physical activity strengthens bones and muscles and improves balance, coordination, and flexibility. For those with osteoporosis, this is essential.

Medically Reviewed by Dr. K on 27th May 2022.

Suitable Exercise Moves For Osteoporosis

You may be concerned that being physical increases the chances of falling and breaking a joint. However, the opposite is true. Falls and fractures may be prevented with a standard, well-designed fitness regimen. That’s because physical activity strengthens bones and muscles and improves balance, coordination, and flexibility. For those with osteoporosis, this is essential.

Check With Your Doctor

Consult the doctor and physical therapist before beginning a new exercise regimen. They will advise you about what is safe for your osteoporosis point, exercise level, and weight.

There is no one-size-fits-all fitness routine for people with osteoporosis. Your routine should be personal to you and dependent on your:

  • Fracture risk
  • Muscle strength
  • Range of motion
  • Level of physical activity
  • Fitness
  • Gait
  • Balance

Other health issues that affect your desire to exercise, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and heart failure, would be taken into account by your doctor. They can refer you to a physical therapist who can teach you exercises to improve your body mechanics and posture, as well as coordination, resistance weights, and other techniques.

Weight-Bearing Exercise Moves for Osteoporosis

Don’t be fooled by the name; these exercise moves for osteoporosis aren’t about pumping iron. They’re standing exercises that push your bones and muscles to work against gravity and hold you upright. The weight on your bones causes your bones to build up and get stronger.

High-impact and low-impact weight-bearing exercises are the two styles of weight-bearing exercises. Workouts that are high-impact include:

  • Jogging
  • Jumping rope
  • Step aerobics
  • Tennis or other racquet sports
  • Pushing a lawnmower or hard planting are examples of yard work 

Exercises with a moderate effect include:

  • Climbing stairs
  • Dancing
  • Hiking

But be cautious. High-impact weight-bearing workouts might not be appropriate for you if the osteoporosis is severe. Consult the physician on your exercise schedule. They can advise you to concentrate on low-impact exercises that will help you develop bone density while reducing the risk of fractures. There are some of them: 

  • Elliptical training machines
  • Low-impact aerobics
  • Stair-step machines
  • Walking (either outside or on a treadmill machine)

If you’re new to fitness or haven’t worked out in a while, steadily increase your workout time until you reach 30 minutes of weight-bearing exercise on most days of the week.

Strengthen Your Muscles

Working the muscles is essential since it can help you avoid injuries caused by falls. Training for functional strength and balance should be a part of the daily routine.

Specific movements such as standing and rising on your toes, raising your body weight with activities such as push-ups or squats, and utilising devices such as:

  • Elastic exercise bands
  • Free weights
  • Weight machines

Strength-training drills can be used with the routines two or three times a week.

Non Impact Exercises

These exercise moves for osteoporosis aren’t specifically designed to strengthen the bones. They will, however, help you to achieve more coordination and stability. You’ll be less likely to slip and break a bone as a result of this. You can do these on a daily basis.

Balance exercises such as Tai Chi can strengthen your leg muscles and help you stay steadier on your feet. Posture exercises can help you work against the “sloping" shoulders that can happen with osteoporosis and lower your chances of spine fractures.

Yoga and Pilates are two exercises that will help people with osteoporosis strengthen their strength, balance, and flexibility. However, some of the movements in these classes, such as forward-bending exercises, may increase fracture risk. If you’re interested in trying these exercises, see your doctor and ask your physical trainer which movements are healthy and which can be avoided.

Almost anyone with osteoporosis will benefit from exercise. But keep in mind that it’s just one part of a comprehensive recovery package. Consume plenty of calcium and vitamin D, maintain a good weight, and avoid smoking or excessive alcohol consumption. You will also need osteoporosis drugs to help you develop or retain bone density. Consult your doctor to determine the best methods for staying safe and solid.

Sources

  1. https://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/guide/osteoporosis-exercise 
  2. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Weightbearing Exercises for Women and Girls."
  3. National Osteoporosis Foundation: “Prevention: Exercise for Healthy Bones," “Safe Movement," “Osteoporosis Exercise for Strong Bones."
  4. American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: “How PM&R Physicians Use Exercise to Prevent and Treat Osteoporosis."
  5. Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases-National Resource Center: “Exercise for Your Bone Health." 
  6. American Osteopathic Association: “Exercise in Post-Menopausal Women."
  7. Vondracek, S. Clinical Interventions in Aging, May 14, 2009.
  8. Kessenich, C. Clinical Interventions in Aging, June 2007. 

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