Is It Safe to Get Vaccinations During Pregnancy?

vaccinations during pregnancy
Source – www.self.com

Everyone wants the best for their babies, but pregnant mommies have to be in good health to deliver good care for the babies. When you get yourself vaccinated with the proper vaccines, most of the time, you are protecting yourself and the baby from any harm during pregnancy. 


Medically Reviewed by Dr. K on 17 Dec 2021.

Is It Safe to Get Vaccinations During Pregnancy?

Everyone wants the best for their babies, but pregnant mommies have to be in good health to deliver good care for the babies. When you get yourself vaccinated with the proper vaccines, most of the time, you are protecting yourself and the baby from any harm during pregnancy. 

Why Should Pregnant Women Be Vaccinated?

Many women may be unaware that their vaccinations are outdated, making them vulnerable to diseases that may damage them or their unborn children. Pregnant women should see their doctors determine which vaccinations they may need and whether they should get them while pregnant or after the birth of their child.

Are Vaccines Safe?

Under the supervision of the FDA, all vaccinations are evaluated for safety. The vaccinations are tested for purity, potency, and safety, and the FDA and CDC keep track of each vaccine’s safety throughout its usage.

Some individuals may be allergic to a vaccine component, such as eggs in the influenza vaccine, and should wait to get the vaccination until they consult with their doctor.

Which Vaccines Can I Receive While I’m Pregnant?

The following vaccinations are deemed safe to provide to women at risk of infection:

  • Hepatitis B: This vaccination is available to pregnant women at high risk for the illness and has tested negative for the virus. It is used both before and after birth to protect the mother and infant against infection. To get immunity, you must take three doses in a row. The second and third dosages are given one and six months following the first.
  • Influenza (inactivated): This vaccination may protect the woman during pregnancy against severe illness. This vaccination should be given to all pregnant women (in any trimester) throughout the flu season. Consult your doctor to find out whether this is the case for you.
  • Tdap (Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis): Tdap is given to protect the infant against whooping cough during pregnancy, ideally between 27 and 36 weeks. It should be given soon after your baby is born if it was not given during pregnancy.

Can a Vaccine Harm My Unborn Baby?

Several vaccinations, particularly live-virus vaccines, should not be administered to pregnant women because they may damage the baby. (A live-virus vaccination is produced using the virus’s live strains.) Some vaccinations may be given to the mother during the second or third trimester of pregnancy, while others must be given at least three months before or shortly after the baby’s birth.

Which Vaccines Should Pregnant Women Avoid?

The following vaccinations can harm an unborn child, including miscarriage, preterm delivery, and birth abnormalities.

  • Hepatitis A: Although the vaccine’s safety has not been shown, it may be administered if the benefits exceed the dangers. Women at high risk of contracting this virus should speak with their doctors about the risks and advantages.
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR): After getting these live-virus vaccinations, women should wait at least one month before becoming pregnant. If the first rubella test reveals that you are not immune to rubella, the vaccination will be administered after you give birth.
  • Varicella: This vaccination, which protects against chickenpox, should be administered at least one month before conception.
  • Pneumococcal: Because the vaccine’s safety is uncertain, it should be avoided during pregnancy unless the mother is at high risk or has a chronic disease.
  • Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) and Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV): For pregnant women, neither the live-virus (OPV) nor the inactivated-virus (IPV) versions of this vaccination are advised.
  • HPV Vaccine: The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus that causes cancer.

What Side Effects Can I Expect After a Vaccination?

Up to three weeks following immunisation, side effects may develop. Please notify your doctor if you develop any serious adverse effects.

  • Hepatitis A: In sporadic instances, there may be soreness and redness at the injection site, headaches, tiredness, and severe allergic response.
  • Hepatitis B: Fever, as well as soreness at the injection site
  • Influenza: Fever, redness, and swelling at the injection site may persist for two days.
  • Tetanus/Diphtheria: Fever, discomfort, and swelling around the injection site
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR): One to two weeks after immunisation, non-contagious rash, swelling of neck glands and cheeks, discomfort and stiffness of joints.
  • Varicella: Up to three weeks following immunisation, you may have a fever, pain or redness at the injection site, a rash, or tiny bumps.
  • Pneumococcal: Fever, as well as discomfort around the injection site
  • Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV): None
  • Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV): At the injection site, there is redness and pain.

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