A Study: Heart Attack Risk Is The Highest During The Christmas Eve

Heart Attack Risk Is The Highest During The Christmas Eve

Cholesterol plaques on artery walls supply oxygenated blood to your heart. When these plaques develop or fall off and form clots, they may impede blood flow and cause a heart attack, also referred to as a myocardial infarction.


Heart Attack Risk Is The Highest During The Christmas Eve

According to new research published in the BMJ, it’s not rodents moving that should cause alarm. Cholesterol plaques on artery walls supply oxygenated blood to your heart. When these plaques develop or fall off and form clots, they may impede blood flow and cause a heart attack, also referred to as a myocardial infarction.

A group from Lund University (Moman A Mohammad, Sofia Karlsson, Jonathan Haddad, Björn Cederberg, Sasha Koul, David Erlinge), Danderyd’s University Hospital (Tomas Jernberg), Uppsala University (Bertil Lindahl), and Orebro University (Ole Fröbert) in Sweden analysed data from the SWEDEHEART database, which includes all patients who had symptoms of a heart attack and were admitted in Sweden under a specialised cardiac care facility.

The researchers wanted to know whether myocardial infarctions were more likely to occur on important holidays (Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, the Epiphany, Good Friday, Easter Eve, Easter Day, Easter Monday, and Midsummer holiday) or important football games (the World Cup and the European Championship tournaments). They tried to compare the prevalence of heart problems throughout the holiday and football tournaments to the rates of myocardial infarction around two weeks before and two weeks after each holiday, as well as one year before and one year after each athletic event. From 1998 to 2013, their study drew 283,014 instances of myocardial infarction from the data.

According to their findings, the risk of heart attacks was increased during Christmas (Eve and Day), New Year’s (Eve and Day), and Midsummer holiday periods, but not during Easter or athletic event days. Heart attacks were most prevalent during the final week of the calendar term, on Mondays, and around 8 a.m. This does not bode well for this year’s days leading up to Christmas, which falls on a Friday. The largest observed danger of myocardial infarction was reportedly on Christmas Eve, when the chance of a heart attack increased up to 37%, with the major risk period being 10 p.m. rather than the early hours.

This SWEDEHEART research is far from the first to reveal how heart attack incidence varies depending on the season of year, day of the week, or event. Previous research, including one issue of the journal Circulation, has found an increase in heart disease deaths in the United States between the Christmas and New Year’s holidays. Similarly, research published in the European Journal of Epidemiology discovered that myocardial infarction rates increased during Islamic holidays in primarily Muslim nations. Of course, such a study can only demonstrate correlations and establish cause-and-effect.

Nonetheless, it is unsurprising that Christmas Eve can tax the physical, mind, and emotions. Take the following measures this week:

Source - Morrisons Corporate

If You Haven't Seen Your Doctor In A While, Schedule An Appointment

In the middle of the holiday bustle, don't forget about your health. Check if you have any early warnings, particularly heart disease risk factors.

Take Your Medications As Prescription

If you're already on them, that is. New prescription pills at random are not appropriate for Secret Santa presents.

Consume Food And Drinks With Caution

Too much liquor, excessive use of salt, an overload of sugar, too much-saturated fat, and far too many unnatural substances should be avoided.

Prevent Foreseeable Conflict

Remember the “ding-dong, ding-dong" chorus from Paul McCartney's “Wonderful Christmastime"? This is the kind of thing someone will do at a family gathering that will cause tension and conflicts. Why waste time rehashing an issue that will never be resolved? Instead, try holding your mouth figuratively rather than literally, which would be strange.

Avoid Overexerting Yourself

Make sure you’re in a decent enough physical form before you plough snow, chop wood, or attempt to descend a chimney. Also, if you don’t want to appear silly, make sure there is snow before you shovel.

Establish Realistic Expectations

Don't allow advertisements, ads, marketing, or other people's bragging to generate unreasonable holiday expectations. A neurology resident once said that pleasure equalled reality minus aspirations. When expectations for a holiday are high, such as when someone sends you elf suspenders as a Secret Santa present when you wanted elf trousers, there will be a lot of disappointment.

Use Social Media Carefully

Other individuals may feel tense and may vent their irritations on you. Messages can be easily misunderstood, especially if someone reads them differently than intended. 

Inform Others If You Feel Lonely

If your “friends" condemn you for feeling lonely, they aren't indeed your friends, and you should find new ones. You'd be amazed how many other individuals feel the same way you do but don't say anything about it. Many individuals may be lonely without even noticing it.

Inform People Around You If You Are Suffering Symptoms

Keep an eye out for any chest discomfort, tightness, breathlessness, dizziness, lightheadedness, or arm tingling.

Maintain A Sense Of Perspective

Remember that the holidays are merely a season that will pass. You won't have to listen to Madonna's “Santa Baby" for long.

Most importantly, remember that it’s perfectly OK if you don’t feel like “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year." Everyone’s life is unique. Don’t forget the importance of the larger picture and allow what occurs in a few days to ruin your whole year.

Sources

Source: Forbes

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