Glossary of ADHD Terms

Medically Reviewed by Dr. K on 12 March 2021

Table of contents
  1. Glossary of ADHD Terms
 

Glossary of ADHD Terms

ADHD, combined type: 

This is the most common form of the disorder. This form of ADHD is characterised by inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.

ADHD, predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type: 

This form involves individuals who are both hyperactive and impulsive, but do not display enough signs of inattention to be categorised as mixed.

ADHD, predominantly inattentive type: 

This personality style has inattention but not hyperactivity or impulsivity. Attention deficiency disorder was the previous name for this form of ADHD (ADD).

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD):

A behavioural and developmental illness. Inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity are also symptoms of ADHD. Symptoms are typically serious enough to cause difficulties in normal life.

Attention deficit disorder (ADD):

This was the old name for ADHD, particularly the inattentive kind. The word “attention deficit disorder" is no longer used.

Executive function deficit: 

Executive function is a set of cognitive skills that ensures that tasks are completed. Someone with a problem with executive control has a hard time planning or beginning projects and completing them. This is a common deficit in people with ADHD.

Clinical trial: 

These are also known as observational studies, because they are used to see how effective modern approaches perform in humans. A new medication may be linked to a current treatment in clinical trials.

Neural: Related to the nervous system.

Neurotransmitter: 

A messenger chemical in the brain that aids in the transmission of nerve impulses between brain cells.

Nonstimulants: 

ADHD signs are often treated with this form of drug. They function by reducing impulsivity and increasing attention span.

Psychostimulants or stimulants: 

People with ADHD are often given these medications. They have an effect on dopamine levels in the brain, which will make them concentrate and ignore distractions.

Sources

Referenced on 2.3.2021:

  1. Mayo Clinic: “Adult ADHD (attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder)."
  2. Attention Deficit Disorder Association.
  3. FamilyDoctor.org: “Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."
  4. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: “NINDS Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder Information Page."
  5. National Institute of Mental Health: “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)."
  6. Understood: “Understanding Executive Function Issues.”
  7. Additude: “Executive-Function Deficits in Children.”
  8. Centre for ADHD Awareness, Canada: “ADHD in the Workplace.”
  9. CHADD of Northern California: “How Adult ADHD Affects Relationships: Strategies for Coping.”
  10. CHADD: “Organization and Time Management.”
  11. https://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/adhd-adults

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